Who knew food could be so unequal?

Food is not really something I think about much, my wife is an excellent cook and does the food stuff at home, this includes much of the shopping and the planning. My job is to eat, make my share of breakfast and packed lunches, and occasionally visit the local shops. (In my defence I do most of the cleaning and ironing).

But food is a real issue and not just in the difference between what we eat and what those in the developing world eat (see the Hunger Notes 2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics), but in what goes on in a relatively wealthy City like Cambridge. That was the theme of the latest Cambridge City Diversity Forum.

Food, Glorious Food was held on 23rd June at the Meadows Community Centre and saw a number of food related presentations followed by a collective exercise to produce an interactive food map of Cambridge. In no particular order we heard from a number of different projects that help to alleviate food poverty and ensure that food is used in a sustainable way.

Foodcycle in Cambridge

They are the local branch of a national movement that

 “serve a delicious lunch at The Centre at St Paul’s Church every Saturday to a range of people from the community. The Centre is at the heart of the community and helps us to reach out to people in the local area. We also work in partnership with local organisations such as the Cambridge Love Food Hate Waste campaign. Each week we collect surplus produce locally from Sainsbury’s, the City Food Bank and Lensfield Road Farmer’s Market and then we turn these ingredients into exciting and nutritious meals for our service users to enjoy”

 

Cambridge Edible Garden

Their face book page says they are

“A new edible garden project at Murray Edwards College in Cambridge for students, University staff & the local community. All are welcome!” and that they “In short, we grow food on-site and then we eat it. Simples”

Cambridge Foodbank

Web http://cambridgecity.foodbank.org.uk/

Part of the national programme of Foodbanks Cambridge City Foodbank  works from 5 distribution centres across the City. In short

“Food is donated

Food is sorted and stored

Frontline professional agencies identify people in crisis

Clients receive short-term emergency food”

Cambridge Sustainable Food

They are

“a broad new alliance of organisations promoting healthy and environmentally sustainable food for all.”

 

So all in all it seems that there is a fair bit going on in the City when it comes to food sustainability and equality. The second half of the meeting reinforced this as all those present wandered round the room adding projects that they were aware of to giant maps of the City. These will eventually be digitised and we will share the results with you once we see them.

Once again the voluntary and community sector are coming up with innovative and practical ways to solve a problem not of their making. These solutions do not cure the disease that sees some people with not enough to eat but they go some way to alleviating some of the symptoms. As a sector (and as individuals) we need to look at how we can eliminate this imbalance.  Cambridge is a wealthy City but this does not mean everyone is wealthy, but surely it is not too much to expect that no one goes hungry!

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